Communication competence spitzberg and cupach

Effective listening is a way of showing concern for subordinates, and that fosters cohesive bonds, commitment, and trust. Effective listening tends to reduce the frequency of interpersonal conflict and increases the likelihood that when conflicts emerge they will be resolved with a "win-win" solution.

Communication competence spitzberg and cupach

Communication competence spitzberg and cupach

Discuss how salience influences the selection of perceptual information. Explain the ways in which we organize perceptual information. Discuss the role of schemata in the interpretation of perceptual information.

Perception The process of selecting, organizing, and interpreting information. This process, which is shown in Figure 2.

Jealousy - Wikipedia

Although perception is a largely cognitive and psychological process, how we perceive the people and objects around us affects our communication. We respond differently to an object or person that we perceive favorably than we do to something we find unfavorable. But how do we filter through the mass amounts of incoming information, organize it, and make meaning from what makes it through our perceptual filters and into our social realities?

Selecting Information We take in information through all five of our senses, but our perceptual field the world around us includes so many stimuli that it is impossible for our brains to process and make sense of it all.

So, as information comes in through our senses, various factors influence what actually continues on through the perception process. Fiske and Shelley E. Taylor, Social Cognition, 2nd ed. Selecting The first part of the perception process, in which we focus our attention on certain incoming sensory information.

Think about how, out of many other possible stimuli to pay attention to, you may hear a familiar voice in the hallway, see a pair of shoes you want to buy from across the mall, or smell something cooking for dinner when you get home from work. We quickly cut through and push to the background all kinds of sights, smells, sounds, and other stimuli, but how do we decide what to select and what to leave out?

Communication competence spitzberg and cupach

Salience The degree to which something attracts our attention in a particular context. The thing attracting our attention can be abstract, like a concept, or concrete, like an object.

Or a bright flashlight shining in your face while camping at night is sure to be salient. The degree of salience depends on three features.

McGraw Hill, We tend to find salient things that are visually or aurally stimulating and things that meet our needs or interests.

投稿規程・執筆要項 | 学会誌 | JASS社会言語科学会

Lastly, expectations affect what we find salient. Creatures ranging from fish to hummingbirds are attracted to things like silver spinners on fishing poles or red and yellow bird feeders. In short, stimuli can be attention-getting in a productive or distracting way. As communicators, we can use this knowledge to our benefit by minimizing distractions when we have something important to say.

As we will learn later in Chapter 12 "Public Speaking in Various Contexts"altering the rate, volume, and pitch of your voice, known as vocal variety, can help keep your audience engaged, as can gestures and movement.

Visual and Aural Stimulation

Conversely, nonverbal adaptors, or nervous movements we do to relieve anxiety like pacing or twirling our hair, can be distracting.

Aside from minimizing distractions and delivering our messages enthusiastically, the content of our communication also affects salience.

Needs and Interests We tend to pay attention to information that we perceive to meet our needs or interests in some way. This type of selective attention can help us meet instrumental needs and get things done. When you need to speak with a financial aid officer about your scholarships and loans, you sit in the waiting room and listen for your name to be called.Research into the many possible relationships, intersections and tensions between language and gender is diverse.

It crosses disciplinary boundaries, and, as a bare minimum, could be said to encompass work notionally housed within applied linguistics, linguistic anthropology, conversation analysis, cultural studies, feminist media studies, feminist psychology, gender studies, interactional.

The Dark Side of Interpersonal Communication examines the multifunctional ways in which seemingly productive communication can be destructive―and vice versa―and explores the many ways in which dysfunctional interpersonal communication operates across a variety of personal relationship contexts.

Research into the many possible relationships, intersections and tensions between language and gender is diverse. It crosses disciplinary boundaries, and, as a bare minimum, could be said to encompass work notionally housed within applied linguistics, linguistic anthropology, conversation analysis, cultural studies, feminist media studies, feminist psychology, gender studies, interactional.

Jealousy generally refers to the thoughts or feelings of insecurity, fear, concern, and envy over relative lack of possessions, status or something of great personal value, particularly in reference to a comparator, a rival, or a competitor..

Jealousy can consist of one or more emotions such as anger, resentment, inadequacy [how?], helplessness or disgust.

initiativeblog.com: The Dark Side of Close Relationships II (): William R. Cupach, Brian H. Spitzberg: Books. Chapter 2 Communication and Perception. Think back to the first day of classes. Did you plan ahead for what you were going to wear?

Did you get the typical school supplies together?

Language and gender - Wikipedia